“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”

TravelHaven News Brief — 10 ways air travel will change in 2014

What does technology have in store for our air travel experience this year? Here are three predictions from MSN.com’s post of an article from Conde Nast Traveler.

What does technology have in store for our air travel experience this year? Here are three predictions from MSN.com’s post of an article from Conde Nast Traveler.

Security improves as TSA’s PreCheck takes off

The EZ-Pass-style express lanes at airport checkpoints are so popular that TSA will expand the program to more than 100 airports in 2014; now it’s open to anyone who can pay $85 for a five-year membership, even without a passport. You must still pass a background check, however, and appear in person for fingerprinting—but even those who don’t apply should benefit if bottlenecks ease for regular folks too. Of course, it’s still very much a work in progress; the TSA has been selecting some fliers to use PreCheck on a trial basis, having the unintended effect of making these express lines occasionally longer than the regular ones.

We finally get do-it-yourself bag tags

Imagine being able to print out and attach your own bag tags at home, eliminating yet another step at the airport. The technology is now available to allow customers to do just that, and the International Air Transport Association (IATA) is pushing for widespread acceptance; airlines like Iberia and Lufthansa are already experimenting. But in the U.S. concerns about baggage security and other hang-ups are slowing progress.

Inflight phone calls are coming, whether we like it or not

The Federal Communications Commission appears poised to allow passengers to make inflight phone calls sometime next year. But most fliers say they’re strongly opposed to the prospect of having to listen to their seatmates babble on endlessly at 30,000 feet. So the ball will be in the airlines’ court. Watch for at least one airline to test the idea—and, naturally, charge for it—just in case the noise pollution isn’t as bad as people fear.

You can see the whole slideshow at http://living.msn.com/life-inspired/life-unleashed/10-ways-air-travel-will-change-in-2014-2.